Rescuers save strangling giraffe from metal wire around his neck

A giraffe in Lubumbashi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, was saved from strangling to death with a metal wire wrapped tightly around his neck, by a team of rescuers.

According to the Daily Mail, the giraffe had been grazing on a private game reserve, but it is not known how the wire became entangled around the animal’s neck. Neil Parsons led the rescue effort with a group of men who didn’t speak English and who were nervous about how to safely bring the animal down long enough to remove the wire.

“Giraffes are one of the harder species to catch. They are easy to dart, but to get them down without dying is a challenge,” Parsons explained to Caters News.

First the team used a tranquilizer dart and wrapped rope around the animal’s legs to ease him into falling easier. Other members of the group then set at removing the wire.

“It had wire wrapped around its neck which was constricting, but hadn’t cut into the flesh yet. If left longer, it probably would have cut into the neck and eventually killed the giraffe, “Parsons added.

Giraffes are nearly extinct in the area, and it is feared only a few dozen are left in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Fortunately the wire was removed quickly, the giraffe was happily freed and rejoined the females at the farm.

Check out the video – a round of applause for everyone involved saving this beautiful animal.

(Photos screenshots via Caters News Service)

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Giraffe cam: April ‘prepping’ for birth as calf is active

In the early Sunday morning bulletin, the Animal Adventure Park in Harpusville, located in upstate New York, announced more news about the impending birth. Will it be soon? Obviously April had no intentions of a St. Patrick’s Day birth: 

“Keepers have noted a calming down of the calf and April carrying everything a bit towards the rear. This is exactly what we want! Wax caps are still in place. Appetite remains strong.”

On Saturday, more than 70 million animal lovers thought for sure the baby would make her debut into the world. Her keeper Alyssa Swilley described the mom-to-be as eating everything in sight and “prepping for something.” The baby was said to have “mastered karate” and making as “much movement as a seasoned sportsman.”

Just in case, you’re just tuning into the April the giraffe’s pending motherhood extravaganza, (to humans although not likely to April) this will  be her fourth calf and her mate Oliver’s first calf. The park boasts some of the largest pens in the nation as far as room for the giraffes to stretch their legs, and the indoor housing section is meant for additional care and health of the animals as well as educational enrichment for the appreciation and knowledge of the species.

Try to imagine – moms all over the world – giraffes are pregnant for 15 months; at birth the calf will be nearly six foot tall and weigh in about 150 pounds upon delivery. April will be in charge of her own calf and if all goes as planned, the baby will be weaned after six to ten months – although that could take longer. Once the baby is born, there will be a contest to name her. Once the baby is fully weaned, she will be transferred to another facility and begin a new breeding program. Interbreeding is not successful nor ever recommended.

And one more fact for the day from the organization:

“The closest living relative of the giraffe is the okapi. Giraffe and Okapi are the only living members of the family Giraffidae. The family was once much larger, but all other members are now extinct. Preservation and conservation matters!”

For more information about the Animal Adventure Park, please click here.