Hypothermic dog did not have rabies

Hypothermic dog, put down for potential rabies, did not have the deadly disease

A hypothermic dog, found near death on a sidewalk in St. Louis, Missouri, did not have rabies. The pit bull, dubbed Faust, was taken in by Stray Rescue of St. Louis and then turned over to a specialized veterinary hospital for care because her condition was so dire.

At the veterinary hospital, Faust bit a veterinary technician – after the bite, Faust was turned over to St. Louis County Animal Care & Control, where she was euthanized because staff stated that she was showing neurological signs consistent with rabies.

But testing on the dog’s brain revealed that she was clear of the deadly disease, reports KMOV News.

Members of the rescue group have stated that the dog’s “neurological” problems were the obvious result of how she was found.  Randy Grim, the rescue group’s founder, stated “Of course Faust couldn’t stand up, of course Faust was wobbly, she was frozen to death.”

After the dog was put down, there was a huge public backlash against Veterinary Specialty Services, who turned her over to animal control. Though the rescue group has expressed disappointment that Faust was not turned over to them, they have since issued an apology via Instagram:

Stray Rescue as an organization would like to apologize and give our total support to the entire veterinary community. You are heroes who save lives every single day. We Cannot understate how difficult it is to work in the field of animal care and the impossible decisions that they are forced to make on a daily basis.

Faust was given amazing care; she miraculously came out of a coma and was only getting stronger. We are sad and regretful that the conversation shifted to blame and backlash. Social media can be such a powerful tool, for good or for bad. Faust should be a symbol for positive change toward more humane animal care and compassion. She is a reminder to us all that there is still a lot of work to be done and that we all need to come together to make these changes possible.”

Yesterday: Dog with two mouths finds a home and inspires formation of a rescue group – more here.

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9 replies
  1. Pamela Garlisch says:

    Amazing that people always seem to take the easy way out. I know that rescues and vets do have a hard time but that dog was getting stronger. I also know that situations do change but a behavior specialist should have been found, more tests done as to why the behavior changed. RIP Faust, humans failed you.

    Reply
  2. Donna Hawkins says:

    I’m not affiliated with this rescue group so I don’t have to cover my butt!! That veterinary hospital over reacted and should have contacted the rescue!! Those symptoms are normal for a hyperthermic animal! Was the veterinarian just out of school!?

    Reply
  3. pennysdachshunds says:

    This IS a Classic Case of ” Blowing Smoke” up YOU Know Where Just to Keep the Peace … The Veterinary Clinic should have had a Much Better Handle on the Circumstances of the poor Little Dog that Was in Pain from being frozen , frightened , and in Need of Understanding … What She Got was the Fatal Shot !!!! You think the Vet `is going to say there was a Mistake and apologize !!! Do Skunks Stink????

    Reply
  4. Barkley's Mom says:

    I’m not surprised the dog didn’t have rabies, it was a frozen weak scared dog. St. Louis County Animal Care & Control should have enough experience to realize that and if they didn’t they should have turned the dog over to the rescue.

    Reply
  5. maxiemom says:

    Everyone here is absolutely correct. The dog’s behavior was consistent with what he’d been through and his condition, not an indication of rabies, and it’s senseless that this ended the way it did. I understand that the rescue HAD to cover itself and apologize: however, it is RIDICULOUS that it did considering that an innocent dog died as a result of a stupid and senseless decision by a vet who should absolutely have known better!

    Reply
  6. Sylvia says:

    You want to apologize for a dog that was miraculously came iut if a coma and started getting stronger and murdering her!!? You should be a shame. Your only sorry because social media is so powerful we now know got caught in murdering a poor dog that was in dire need of help. So sad!! Might as well thrown her to the wolves that put her their in the first place!!

    “Faust was given amazing care; she miraculously came out of a coma and was only getting stronger. We are sad and regretful that the conversation shifted to blame and backlash. Social media can be such a powerful tool, for good or for bad. Faust should be a symbol for positive change toward more humane animal care and compassion. She is a reminder to us all that there is still a lot of work to be done and that we all need to come together to make these changes possible.”

    Reply

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