Painful reminder what could happen: Dogs and July 4th fireworks

Just around the corner is Independence Day. It’s a noisy holiday as many people shoot off July4th fireworks in their backyards; legal and illegal. Is your dog scared of fireworks?

On the Facebook page of St Clair Shores, Michigan Residents Group comes a painful and heartbreaking reminder of what happened on Saturday as a neighbor shot off commercial fireworks. Dog owner Lenka Perron shares her story as a painful and heartbreaking reminder:

“I am going to be very measured in my response right now, although we are all emotional and angry over here.

While relaxing in the backyard tonight, nearby neighbors set off commercial grade fireworks that sounded like they were in our backyard.

Dwight, our little greyhound, panicked and before I could react, he escaped through our gate, hurting himself in the process. He ran full speed towards Jefferson and anywhere else he could to escape,” Lenka wrote.

Dwight was so frantic he seriously injured every pad on all four of his paws; they were gone; bleeding and raw.

“And in his fear, he managed to defecate and urinate on himself while running. He will now always have an extreme fear at the first sound of fireworks.”

The family ran barefooted to rescue Dwight. The city ordinance only allows fireworks for the 4th of July holiday from July 3 to July 5 and nothing  later than 11 p.m. Lenka does have a message:

“Those animal and firework statistics? Those Facebook posts? They mean something.”

Pet owners are urged to be prepared:

  • Condition your pets to noise and start carrying around treats. Whenever there is a sudden noise – bangs, booms; lavish the treats on your dog. Don’t just give them treats for good behavior – just when the noise occurs.
  • Create a safe place for your dog. Remember the flashes of light can be scary also. Try to mute the loud noises with foam or blankets.
  • Play music and use fans. How many pet parents leave the television on when they’re gone or leave music playing? Turn up the volume. Recorded white noise and lower frequencies work better.
  • Make sure fences are secure just in case! Make sure your dog is wearing an identification collar.
  • Comfort your dog. Don’t make him “tough it out.” Perhaps some lap time, a new toy, a ride in the car or some extra cuddles?
  • Ask your veterinarian for medication if necessary.

Get well soon Dwight.

(Photos via Facebook)

More news and updates on the National Pet Rescue Facebook page.

Shelter desperate for foster home – dog is incredibly distressed at facility. Read more here.

Clifford is so stressed that he had to be moved to a garage

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5 replies
  1. Adrienne says:

    I always wonder if those who shoot off the large cannon fireworks have any pets themselves? Even cats react to fireworks yet no one in most towns want to limit the days you can do this or up till what time? We have nitwits shooting these things off weeks before the 4th of July, as well as after. Do they ever care that the noise is too much for weeks on end for most humans to deal with too? Unfortunately, by the time you call the police, the people have stopped their fireworks.

    Reply
  2. Red says:

    I do not know why parents spend the obscene amounts of money they do on fireworks….take your kids to a professional show and give them sparklers….. why do you have to let them set off firecrackers and even larger noise makers!!!

    Reply

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