Humane Society International rescuing 80 dogs from South Korean meat farm

Humane Society International (HSI) is one of the leading global organizations working in countries across Asia to end the suffering on dog meat markets. On Sunday evening, the Animal Rescue Team began to remove 80 dogs from a South Korean meat farm.


The planning phase for the rescue efforts began on February 8, when the HSI team identified the dog meat farm down the road from the Winter Games. An agreement with the farmer was reached, and he signed a contract to relinquish the 80+ dogs and shut his facility down forever.  Rescue preparations took nearly a month; it was all a huge undertaking that required heavy financial help, planning and coordination. Bedding, crates, transport and food were all part of the plans to rescue the dogs.

Check out the video of Moon Bear, a dog who had been deprived of all human attention and affection until the Director of Animal Protection and Crisis Response, Adam Parascandola gave him some much needed love and attention. The dog lived on a short chain in below freezing temperatures and has no idea what is in store for him beginning this evening:


The dog meat farmers working with the HSI have closed down their farms voluntarily and are being helped to transition to new forms of farming such as blueberries and mushrooms. The farmers sign and honor contracts assuring the organization they will never return to the dog meat trade, and HSI conducts follow-up visits to make sure everyone is complying with their agreements.

“If there is a breach of such agreements, we will respond accordingly,” the HSI states. “We are committed to the welfare of dogs and all animals, and will continue to ensure all farmers are in compliance of their contractual agreements.”

The rescued dogs will be transported to the organization’s Emergency Placement Partner (EPP) shelters in Canada—who will then facilitate the adoptions after assessing and addressing any health or behavioral concerns.

If you’d like to support HSI’s rescue efforts, please donate here:

  • $35 – pays for food and bedding for one dog during quarantine prior to arrival
  • $50 – buys a sturdy, comfortable crate for transport of one pup off the farm
  • $100 – covers the cost of a veterinarian examination, vaccinations, and issuance of health certificate for travel

Sign your name to the petition to protect dogs and cats in South Korea.

“South Korea is the only country in the world known to have established a large-scale intensive dog meat farming industry, in which more than 2.5 million dogs a year endure for their meat – a delicacy food that fewer and fewer Koreans choose to eat. The suffering of these dogs is undeniable. They are kept in small barren cages, without protection from the harsh elements or even a solid floor on which to stand. Physical injury from self-mutilation or fighting are commonplace, and death from disease, hunger, or exposure is rife. For those who survive the grim farm life, death by electrocution is painful and terrifying. Furthermore, the indiscriminate  use of antibiotics on these farms to keep the animals alive poses grave risks to human health.

Most people in South Korea don’t regularly eat dog meat. Public opinion is turning and, like us, they agree that dogs are friends not food and that all dogs are equally worthy of compassion and protection from cruelty.

Humane Society International and our partners are committed to ending the dog meat industry in South Korea, by exposing the cruelty, raising vital public and political awareness, and increasing support for a phase out. A vital step towards this goal is the legal recognition of all dogs as companion animals protected from cruelty.”

Read about the pregnant dog rescued from the South Korean meat farm who welcomed her litter in a safe world.

Read more about the dog meat trade as well as helping all animals by clicking here.

(Photos and video courtesy of HSI via Facebook)

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5 replies
  1. Nancy Raymond says:

    These dogs deserve homes and with the overcrowding in all shelters I would hate to see these poor animals being rescued only to be put down because there are no homes for them.

    • carrie ainsley says:

      It is my understanding that most have homes waiting for them before they even arrive, and there are lists of people who have signed up to participate as a foster or permanent home.




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