Woman blames airline for death of her dog

Woman blames airline for death of her beloved dog

An Oregon woman is devastated after the loss of her beloved dog, “Jacob,” and she is blaming an airline for his death. According to Saturday’s Click On Detroit News, Kathleen Considine’s golden retriever was supposed to fly via United Airlines from Detroit, to Portland, with a relatively short one hour layover in Chicago.

Things went awry when United Airlines decided that the retriever was too big to fit on the plane which was bound for Portland, so the dog was kenneled overnight in Chicago. In a Facebook post, Considine explained:

When Jacob landed in Chicago, it was found that the airline agent LIED and he did not fit on the plane to Portland. He was then sent to a kennel over night, 20 HOURS, until the next flight out he could fit on.
The airline DID NOT ALLOW my mother to send food with Jacob, due to the intended short duration of his journey, even though it is mandated that the crates have a food bowl and their website states they may have a zip lock bag less than 1 pound of food attached to the top of their crate.

By the time that Jacob made it to Oregon, he was “disoriented and non-responsive.” According to Considine, someone with the airline told her that Jacob may have been given a medication, in explanation from his disoriented condition. Considine wrote, “After rushing Jacob to the emergency vet when his breathing became scarce, he was pronounced dead after 8 min of CPR. His stomach flipped due to the stress of his journey that was 20 hours longer than expected, and suffocated his organs.”

Considine has stated that United Airlines has taken to responsible for the death of her dog and now, she is hoping to spread the word that dogs should not be transported by the airline. On her Facebook post, she wrote, “My heart is broken and I never want this to happen to another dog parent.”

Considine has stated that her dog underwent a physical the day before he flew – he was only seven years of age and healthy.

(Photo via Facebook)

National Dog News on Facebook here.

28 replies
    • Lucy says:

      Edward Nagle, I suggest you get your offensive little butt back into EDUCATION. Where you may learn to read and comprehend what has been written. This will help you avoid appearing to be a compassionless, idiotic little rock.

      The airline was at fault. Not the owner.

      Reply
      • linda says:

        Penny Eim, on the last paragraph shouldn’t your comment be “United Airlines has taken no responsibilities for the death….” and not what is posted?

      • Jay says:

        He can’t read need to take some night classes. I know another dog will replace the one you lost i dont ship puppies i will have the transport by ground transportation. When you ready for a new puppy i donate on puppy out of every litter for a good cause email me at shamelesj@yahoo.com if i have a puppy at that time i donate you one just need to figure out how to get to Portland i am in new mexico i raise alustrian Sheppard mini’s and toys I sell then donate money to the wound warrior foundation. Or to a charity i dont keep no of the money but that guy need to go to night school learn to read sorry you lose you child my dogs are like my kids i know how you feel I would sue them for the lost good luck and you will be in my prayers

  1. Barkley's Mom says:

    I’ve seen more than one horror story concerning pets being flown like this and have concluded if mine have to cross the country, I will be driving them. My heart goes out to Kathleen Considine for her loss, why these airlines can’t be more responsible with a living breathing animal is beyond me, I imagine Ms Considine cost for this service wasn’t cheap either. Rest in peace Jacob, Condolences for your family, this is just heartbreaking.

    Reply
  2. Susan Bissell says:

    My heart goes out to Considine and her dog, Jacob, may be rest in peace. Why is it today you can’t trust people to do their jobs??? Don’t they care about the poor dog and what it was going through flying and being kept lock up in a dog carrier for so many hours?!?!

    Reply
  3. Rosita says:

    Wat is dit toch verschrikkelijk!!!!…zoiets had nooit mogen gebeuren, en worden ze vervolgd?…zal wel weer niet!…ik wens die vrouw heel veel sterkte!!!!!

    Reply
  4. resqdogz says:

    Actually, the correct quote (taken from Kathleen’s Facebook post) should read “UNITED AIRLINES IS ASSUMING ZERO RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE DEATH OF MY BEST FRIEND”

    Coming from a former career in commercial aviation, I can only say “I hope Kathleen sues-the-sh*t out of ’em!”..

    Rest-in-peace, precious Jacob…

    Reply
  5. Nancy says:

    Sad that the airlines took it upon themselves to deny a dog food, medicate an animal that was not theirs and then Jacob died as a result of their negligence. I am so sorry that Jacob died. Airlines don’t care about animals. I fail to see why the person above is so hateful towards a woman that lost her dog, apparently I read the story wrong according to him she killed her own dog.

    Reply
  6. ellen cottone says:

    united airlines acepts full responsibility.
    Because their is absolutly no punishment said airline will face. they just dont care.
    because they dont have to.

    Reply
  7. Tracy Whitcomb says:

    Why the Hell would she go to Jail? It was not her fault. United Airlines should be fined and made to give an apology for this and that still would not be enough. She was NOT to Blame, United was.

    Reply
  8. Kathleen Drude says:

    This is not an isolated case! For those of you who have dogs please don’t let the air lines tell you lies! This could have been prevented! More and more pet parents are traveling with their dogs and cats! The problem comes when the dog is over a certain weight! Please lend your voices to the rest of ours say to the air lines they need to change the way they transport pets! It is past time and no more pets have to die because some baggage handler has no idea how to handle live snimals!

    Reply
  9. Shelly sruscito69@gmail says:

    I will never fly my dog or cat!! I may never use United Airlines again either. My heart goes out to the owner. She should sue. RIP doggie. So sorry for you and your loving owner.

    Reply
  10. Marianne says:

    So sad. Even a direct flight is traumatic on an animals especially a large dog at 7 years of age. Gastric torsion unfortunately isn’t uncommon in deep chested breeds. Add take off, landing, take off landing and the pressure changes associated with it. Our ears feel the pressure, imagine how it would feel in the belly of a plane. I know it’s “supposed” to be pressurised, but my ears still feel it in the cabin. Perhaps this tragedy will prevent others. Sorry for her loss.

    Reply
  11. Carrie Ainsley says:

    Bloat can happen any time, any where. That being said, I’m in favor of driving dogs / pets and not flying them. I read about a cat who arrived frozen solid in her carrier at the end of a flight – that is a much clearer case of fault and negligence. That story is why my animals don’t fly.

    Reply
  12. Nancy Lessard-Binette says:

    December 23, 2015. American Airlines is responsible for dropping my dog’s crate at some point in transport from California to Massachusetts. The brand new, Petmate Crate and rated to 90#dog wa for the 43l# dog, I had to transport from CA to MA.
    I discovered the crate was split across the bottom days after I noticed dog was not bearing weight on his left back leg. Vetrinary radiographs revealed a torn ligament in his left knee. I noticed the limp when he exited the crate but, after 7 hours laying in the crate, I thought maybe poor circulation, I didn’t see the break in the bottom of the crate, because of the bed I had put in the bottom of the for days. I recalled, waiting near an hour at Logan for them to bring me my dog, and wonder if it happened there. I sent a letter, Emails and calls to AA, they wanted indisputable Vetrinary documentation from before and after the flight to prove this injury occurred when he was in their transport.
    All Vet documents did not point to a lameness of that knee, however a right hip FHO surgery was noted, and some degenerative arthritis in his knees, was mentioned in x-ray reports. The damage to the crate, and lameness that was not present prior to the flight, I am sure of, as I spent 4 days in CA, with this dog, and met with the surgeon for following up from FHO, hip surgery, and to get his Health Certificate.
    I had the brand new crate shipped to CA a month before I flew out to bond with the dog, before putting him on a flight home with me.
    American Airlines demanded to prove them at fault for a damaged knee, estimated to cost $3200, to surgically repair. Never again

    Reply
    • mike says:

      I have heard horror stories about cat transport when my mom who raised color points was told stories about airline transport when they arrived dead back in the 1980’s. The the airlines now say they have made sure the safety of animals….obviously they don’t!!!!!

      Reply
  13. Jay says:

    I left a message on a reply sorry. This last guy need to go to night classes and learn to read. I know it’s hard to get over a loss of a family member my dogs are like my kids. I raise alustrian Sheppard mini’s and toys I donate one puppy out of every litter and the one I sell i donate money to wounded warrior foundation or to a charity. When you think you ready for another member let me know i will donate you a aussie but will need to figure out how to get to you i am in new mexico your in Portland that like 1800 miles ride one way but if you decide you ready and want one contact me at shamelesj@yahoo.com and tell me is subject what’s it’s about so I don’t over look it or put email on Facebook leave me a message will figure a way to get you a new baby and can send you some pictures that way sorry for your lose you and your family will be in my prayers. I would sue they are at fault that like losing a child I feel for you this is so said brought tears to my eyes. I so sorry if this was to soon just keep my email when your ready months or a yr i keep my word

    Reply

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