GTS Husky Rescue struggling to keep their doors open

When GTS Husky Rescue was founded in 2014, their goal and mission was to save arctic breed dogs from high kill shelters across the nation. Although specializing in these breeds, they have also taken in and helped others when space allows.

Located in Jupiter, Florida, GTS Husky Rescue is a 100% no-kill shelter strictly run by volunteers with no paid staff members.  All dogs stay either on the ranch or with a foster until they can be adopted. Those dogs that are deemed “unadoptable” due to behavior problems or medical issues, are either kept at the ranch or placed in long-term foster homes while they are rehabilitated.  According to the statement on their website, they are “dedicated to improving the lives of helpless dogs.”

Unfortunately, their dedication to fulfilling that statement has gotten them in to some dire financial straits; almost to the point where they may have to close their doors. This is due partially to having taken on so many dogs with extreme medical conditions and behavioral issues needing training that funding has become scarce. Because they are a 501©3, they strictly rely on donations.

Two of their rescue dogs in 2016 had been hit by cars; both needed extensive hip surgery and physical therapy.  One dog Corinna had to have cancer removed and required treatment for heartworm and a fungal infection.  Along with her physical ailments, Corinna is also terrified of people which required work with a behaviorist.  Sasha, another GTS Husky Rescue dog, came with severe food and toy aggression which also required training and work with a behaviorist. Thai, has had all her cancerous tumors removed, but also needs a trainer due to biting issues. All of these dogs came from high kill shelters, and all could not be adopted out because of these issues. If it weren’t for GTS Husky Rescue they would surely have been destroyed.

To end the 2016 year, GTS took on two more hard luck cases; Noel, a German Shepherd/Husky mix from Palm Beach County Animal Control who had a fractured pelvis and Jacob who has neurological issues.

Jacob, a two-year-old male Husky was at Miami Dade Animal Services (MDAS) who in turn called on GTS to rescue him. After his neuter surgery, it took him 24 hours to wake up, which is highly unusual. When he finally did wake up, his head was tilted and he could not walk straight. GTS contacted a neurologist for Jacob. The neurological exam proved to be inconclusive, so the next step is an MRI and a spinal tap. Unfortunately, when GTS was asked by MDAS to take Jacob, it was unbeknownst to them that he had any afflictions at all. Per MDAS, he was a healthy dog.   However, when reaching out to Jacob’s original owner, she confirmed he had been experiencing seizures which is why she turned him over to MDAS. She did not disclose this to MDAS.

GTS Husky Rescue is hoping Jacob can go on to be a healthy dog, but this is not a realistic hope unless he can be completely diagnosed and treated. All of this will be very costly.

Although GTS Rescue does not like to rescue beyond their means and capabilities, they have taken on two very expensive medical cases within a few weeks. They are committed to these dogs now, so they must stay the course until both dogs are completely well. Because GTS Husky Rescue has taken on so many hardship cases from all over the nation, their vet bill is enormous. They put out a plea for help so they can keep their doors open and continue to help homeless dogs, blind dogs, breeder dogs, hoarder dogs and even owner surrenders which many rescues do not take in.

The organization completely relies on donations to vet the dogs, upkeep the ranch, feed the dogs and maintain their vaccinations and medications. Since they opened in 2014, GTS Husky Rescue has saved the lives of 400 dogs that otherwise would have died because no one else wanted them.

(Photo courtesy of GTS Husky Rescue)

To donate to GTS Husky Rescue, or to view adoptable dogs, or for fostering and volunteering opportunities visit their website https://www.gtshuskyrescue.com/.

For an opportunity to donate only, visit their fundraiser here: https://www.gofundme.com/help-jacob-from-mdas-neurological.

 

 

 

 

 

4 replies
  1. Andrew Wilson says:

    Bitter disappointment with this organization.
    I am a 4 time Malamute owner and my wife and I have had three together.
    We recently had our Great Pyrenees that we rescued at 2 years old and heartworm positive pass at 12 years old. He had lots of issues, was badly mistreated and it took us years to normalize his behavior.
    We decided we wanted another malamute, a puppy so as not to deal with other people’s problems. Being responsible pet owners, we felt that a rescue operation was the way to go. We contacted GTS Husky Rescue and they had malamute puppies available. We applied, did the interviews, the home inspections, repaired our fence and they scheduled an appointment on the weekend to select a puppy. We received a call two days later saying there was a problem. They would not approve us for a puppy but wanted to take an older dog.

    Now don’t get me wrong, but we were up front with them. I feel we were treated unfairly by some mysterious “board”. Thankfully, money is not an issue and we will be reaching out to a breeder to select a new family member. But not buying from a breeder was our whole issue with going to a rescue in the first place.

    Based on our experience, stay away or go to a different rescue organization.

    Reply
    • Eo says:

      No surprise. GTS epitomizes a lot of the problems with dog rescues today. Some of their adoption criteria borders on the absurd, and makes it nigh on impossible for dogs to find homes.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *